Subject Verb Agreement With Inverted Sentences

20. Words used as words and not as grammatical parts of the sentence require singular verbs. 28. Pluralist themes, followed by a singular appositive, require a plural verb; In the same way, a single subject, followed by a plural application, requires a singular verb. 19. Some names such as scissors, jeans and salaries have plural shapes, but not singular counterparts. These names almost always take the plural. 25. Some names such as measles, news and calculations that seem plural in form are in fact singularly in number. These words take singular verbs. Perhaps a clearer, more practical way to describe this subject-verb chord of inverted sentences is this: if the subject and the predicate of a sentence are different in number, the bound verb corresponds to the number of the noun rate to its left. The normative phrase: “What I need is two round trips to Puerto Princesa,” that is, vice to “Two round trips to Puerto Princesa are what I need.” 27.

A noun rate or a clause that is the subject of a sentence requires a singular verb. In the example above, the plural corresponds to the actors of the subject. 4. For compound subjects bound by or/nor, the verb corresponds to the subject that comes close to it. 5. When a sentence begins with an explative like there, here, or she, the verb is in agreement with the subject, not with the expletive. 2. In an inverted sentence beginning with a preposition sentence, the verb always corresponds to its subject.

However, be aware that in English, inverted sentences have a particularity of subject-verb agreement if the predicate is a name sentence and not just a simple name or pronoun. This feature is not obvious if there is no difference in numbers between the subject and the predicate, if the sentence is upside down “The winners of the contests were them” or in the normative “They were the winners of the contests”. In both sentences, the theme is plural (“the winners of the contests” and “them”), the verb is in the plural form (“were” and “were”), and the subject complement is also plural (“she” and “the winners of the contests”). ยป 3.

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